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Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) and Credit Card Information: Who’s Affected?

Is your receipt worth money?

You may be entitled to money damages based on information on your receipts.

Federal law protects consumers’ private information from being disclosed on credit and debit card receipts.

Under the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA), vendors can only print the last five digits of a card number on a receipt and cannot include any portion of the card’s expiration date.

If a retailer, restaurant, or other vendor prints receipts from credit card transactions that contain more than this information, they may be violating consumer rights under FACTA. In these situations, consumers may be able to collect compensation by taking legal action.

This example shows what numbers to look for and what a FACTA violation may look like:

Receipt showing FACTA violation

Do you qualify?

You may qualify to participate in this credit card receipt lawsuit investigation under the following circumstances:

  • A retailer printed more than the last five digits of your credit card number on a receipt; and/or
  • A retailer printed the expiration date on a receipt.

Individuals who take legal action against vendors who printed too much information on their receipts may be able to collect between $100 and $1000 under FACTA.

Additionally, individuals who serve as lead plaintiffs in a FACTA class action lawsuit may be able to collect an incentive award if the lawsuit results in a settlement. In some cases, Courts have approved incentive awards as much as $20,000 dollars.

(Please note: Submitting your information on this page is not a guarantee that you will receive a reward, incentive or otherwise, even if the attorney accepts your case. The attorney to whom your information is being forwarded may not accept your case.)

Fill out the form on this page for a free case evaluation by an experienced credit card receipt privacy lawyer.

 

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